Fraser-Pryce the fourth world champion to run 100 meters

Jamaican QATAR, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce won easily the final of the 100m athletics world championship in Doha.

Fraser-Pryce came in first with a record of 10.71 seconds, 11% faster and 19% faster than the runner-up legs, followed by Dina Asher-Smith and Ivory Coast Marie-Josée Ta Lou.

This is the fourth time the Fraser-Pryce world champion runs 100m. This feat comes round a decade after the first time the 32-year-old athlete was crowned in this content of the world track and field. The gold medal in Doha is more meaningful to Fraser-Pryce because she just returned to play after giving birth 13 months ago.

“Winning the World Championship again at 32 and holding my baby in my arms is a dream come true for me”, Fraser-Pryce said in a choked voice after stepping down from the podium to receive the medal and hugging her son Zyon. “I didn’t sleep last night. The last time I went to a big tournament was 2016 and I couldn’t sleep because of stress. But by willpower, you can do what you want.”

In the final competition, Fraser-Pryce continues to promote the strength of the starting point – her forte helped her be nicknamed “Pocket Rocket”. After only the first 30 meters, she broke up to occupy the position of one of the seven legs running to compete, then maintain this advantage to reach the finish line after 10.71 seconds.

This result is equal to the achievement when Fraser-Pryce won the second 100m world title of his career, in Moscow in 2013 and only 1% second below her personal record.

Running in the lane beside Fraser-Pryce, Dina Asher-Smith competed fiercely. And the reward for the 23-year-old’s effort is the first silver medal in the world with a 100m running record for an English athlete, thanks to the result of 10.83 seconds. Ta Lou, a 100m runner-up at the 2017 tournament, finished third with a fraction of a second faster than the reigning Jamaican Olympic champion Elaine Thompson.

American track and field athlete Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce

The relatively popular athlete became the first Caribe woman to win a gold medal at 100m content.


Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, OD (Born on December 27, 1986) is a Jamaican athlete. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, Fraser-Pryce became famous in the 2008 Summer Olympics when he was 21 years old.

In the 100 m content at the 2012 Summer Olympics, she successfully defended her title, becoming the third woman to win two consecutive 100 m gold medals at the Olympics. After winning a bronze medal at the 2016 Summer Olympics, she became the first woman in history to win a 100-year content medal at three consecutive Olympic Games.

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Fraser-Pryce has won a 100 m content gold medal in the 2009 IAAF World Championship, becoming the second female sprinter to hold both the world title and the 100 Olympic Games at the same time (after Gail Devers). After winning the world title in 2015 for 100 m content, she was the only female to be awarded a gold medal in the world content 100m three times (2009, 2013, 2015). She is also the only female athlete to top both the world championships and the Olympic Games in non-consecutive times when she won the 2008 and 2009 Olympic Games titles and then the Olympics title. In the 2013 and 2013 Olympics. In the 2013 IAAF World Championship, she became the first female sprinter to win a gold medal in 100 m, 200 m and 4 × 100 m in a single world championship. Fraser-Pryce was the first woman to own the IAAF’s world title in content 60 m, 100 m, 200 m, and 4 × 100 m relay and was the only woman ever to hold it all at the same time.

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Nicknamed the “Pocket Rocket” for her petite figure (she was only 1.52 m tall) and began to explode, she was ranked fourth in the list of 25 best-performing female athletes in content. The 100m female sprinter with the best individual was 10.70 seconds set in Kingston, Jamaica in 2012. Her achievements and consistency have made Olympian and sports commentator Michael Johnson call her “The greatest female sprinter of all time”. After her victory of 100 m content at the 2015 World Championship, the IAAF also called her “the greatest female sprinter in history”.